Posts Tagged ‘Urban Design

Take a Seat

10, نوفمبر 2010

Take a Seat

Jason Eppink’s Creative Triumphs

Rooted in New York City subway station, Take a Seat is an ongoing social design project focused on the issue of available seating. By supplying used but perfectly functional chairs from dumpsters and piles of trash, the members of this project were able to reassign chair locations in areas of the station at which subway goers would usually have to stand for extended periods of time. The success of this project dwells on the fact that it makes someones trash another persons useful asset just by the simple idea of reassigning locations of the chairs.

notes: This design project was unique in the fact that it was more of a service then a design. Similar to Eppink’s project that we studied previously in 1060 (the portable wooden bridge built over a messy sidewalk leak), this design is meant for the purpose of serving others without much cost to either side. Specifically, Take A Seat takes used and disposed of chairs and assigns them to a new location and purpose for which they will be adopted and loved which is an awesome alternative to letting it end up in the landfills or to rot as pollution. Putting these used chairs in subway stations is a social design from which all can benefit.

Categories:

social design, community design, innovative design, environmental design

Negotiations:

Usability of chairs vs Aesthetics of chairs, Effective increase of sitting spaces vs. Clutter/hazardous, Spontaneous chair bringing (temporal chairs) vs issue of stealing and crime arising from chair mobility, desire for more seating vs surplus of seating (is there a cap on the number of chairs? who will enforce it?)

REWORKED Negotiations:

Comfort vs. Clutter

Flow of traffic vs. increase of sitting spaces

Individual (introverted) experience vs. group (extroverted) experience

Timeliness vs. Friendliness

Comfort vs. Safety

Inner-City Arts and Grassroots

10, نوفمبر 2010
Group Members: Hilary Yeganegi, Andreas Nilsson, John Walker, Sarah Lashinsky
 

Inner-City Art    

Inner-City Arts    

Notes 
 
 
Inner-City Arts describes itself on it’s website as “an oasis of learning, achievement and creativity for underserved children in the heart of Skid Row”.  The Los Angeles arts education program is a haven for local children and youth, and offers them with every amenity to submerge themselves in studio life.  Professional teaching artists provide hands-on instruction in well-equipped studios.  ICA’s campus is the ideal venue for creation.  Architect Michael Maltzan repurposed an abandoned garage, and outfitted it with simple, geometrical design.  The workspaces manage to accommodate lots of students, yet are still intimate. To kids who may have come to believe that “dreams are for other children”, ICA may be the perfect micro-city in a rough-and-tumble neightborhood.    

 

 

Negotiations    

Architect and Students    

Architect and Business Owners    

Architect and Teachers    

Students and Teachers    

Why did we choose this?    

Inner-City Arts caught our eye when we were browsing around MoMA’s website for their Small Scale, Big Change project.  The campus is so beautiful we were intrigued to discover that it is actually in skid row.  In the end, we’re happy to give this project any exposure; it seems that Inner-City Arts does a lot of good.

http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/smallscalebigchange/projects/inner_city_arts

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_lPWGhJUDw&feature=related

Taxonomic Categories    

Charitable Design, Urban Design, Urban Integration, Community-Based Design

Sources

http://www.inner-cityarts.org/index.php

http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/smallscalebigchange/projects/inner_city_arts

    

Grassroots    

Notes    

Grassroots.org is an organization that promotes social changes by endorsing other smaller organizations by offering them money to fulfill their goals. The organization offers an average of $10,000 a year for each organization. Basically the website is there to promote the creation of grassroots organizations and to get them started.    

Negotiations    

Donors and the website    

Donors and Grassroots organizations    

The Website and Grassroots organizations    

Grassroots organizations and society    

Grassroots organizations and their cause    

Why did we choose this?    

Grassroots.org provides money for grassroots organizations that are trying to start a social change, but might not have enough resources to become a fully started organization. Many grassroots organizations have trouble starting up because they are being funded by only a couple of people so usually there is a lack of resources and have trouble spreading their cause. So grassroots.org helps these grassroots organizations spread their cause by funding them.    

Taxonomic Categories    

Societal Design, Communal Design, Economic Design, Charitable Design

Sources

http://www.grassroots.org/

http://www.dnjournal.com/articles/gr.htm

Sustainable Design

10, نوفمبر 2010

GWAM:  Grant Wilson, Andrew Miller

SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE

Even though many aspects of design help a creation become successful, there are a few instances when a design or well thought out idea fails.  This was apparent in the Haitian earthquake in January of 2010, in comparison to the Chilean earthquake in February of 2010.  Our group sought a case study that dealt with sustainable design that would have a great impact on larger scales, since we dwell in the large scale, intricate city known as Atlanta.  The idea was formed after hearing about the impact the earthquake had on the architectural structures within Haiti and Chile.  In Haiti, hundreds of thousands of people died after the earthquake that struck the nation, mainly because of the architecture within the Haitian nation.  Buildings and other structures were built to resist the vibrations from earthquakes, causing them to crumble as the vibrations increased.  This lead to the crumbling of buildings with many people inside them, thus causing the death toll of this tragic event to be so high.

However, Chile is a country with with a high risk of earthquakes occurring, due to its location on the globe.  Therefore, many of its homes and offices are built to sway with seismic waves rather than resist them through the use of moats at the base. Cameron Sinclair, executive director of Architecture for Humanity even stated “when you look at the architecture in Chile, you see buildings that have damage, but not the complete pancaking that you’ve got in Haiti.”  Sinclair also claims that it is required by blueprints and building codes in Chile that even the low-income houses must be built to withstand the event of an earthquake of any magnitude.  By changing architectural techniques in Haiti, more people could be saved, and less materials could be used in the rebuilding process of the nation, thus allowing humans to sustain the resources they draw from.

This case study isn’t a project that is currently underway in Haiti, but a design fix that, if implemented, could save hundreds of thousands of lives during the next Haitian earthquake.  Some negotiations involved with this “design fix” might include how to implement this design without adversely affecting customs and culture, how the materials and equipment might fair against earthquakes of various magnitudes, and how to financially accomplish the implementation of this new architectural design.

Taxonomic Categories:

Earthquake, Chile, Haiti, Architectural Structures

Negotiations:

Between the earthquake and the people, between the people and the city

Source:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/27/chile-haiti-earthquake-co_n_479705.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/mar/01/chile-earthquake-resistant-design

cricketdiane.wordpress.com

GREEN GIANTS

We wanted our case studies to focus on helping the environment and the future.  After coming across some pretty interesting results, we found that Green Giants Eco-friendly Urban Design Projects was the most unique to us.  While many people are against constructing massive buildings and projects, the giants designs given through these eco-friendly building designs can solve many problems.  The benefits from implementing these buildings are endless.  Just a few examples are that it provides accessible green spaces for dense urban living, grows fresh produce in the ‘concrete’ jungle, and just an overall cleaner atmosphere for living in.   This could even be incorporated into business buildings to help them be self sustaining and efficient.  This can be done so it collecting rain water and recycling it through filters using it throughout the building in its gardens and other facilities that require water.  Cutting down costs and energy is key for this to be efficient and beneficial to the future.  This could be directly beneficial to us since we do live in the large urban environment of Atlanta.  It would not only help us today, but it will help the future of earth.

Taxonomic categories:

Urban Living, Eco-Friendly, Ergonomical, Urban Design, Environment

Negotiations:

Between the grower and the consumer, how the design project is financed and how it is paid for, between the people and the green space

Source:

http://webecoist.com/2010/04/12/green-giants-13-huge-eco-friendly-urban-design-projects/

The High Line

9, نوفمبر 2010

By Samantha Sussberg, Carly Smith, Kiyah Critendon, Jennifer Driesbach


The High Line is the perfect example of innovative design- taking old ideas and recreating them into new ones. This park is located on the West Side in Manhattan’s Meat Packing District. This area was constructed in the 1930’s in order to elevate industrial freight trains and get them off of the streets of New York. A section of this old structure was turned over to the city of New York and redesigned as a public park. The park was finally opened in June, 2009, and stretches for about a mile and a half. While walking through this narrow strip of park, it is easy to forget that you are in the middle of a city; that is, until you remember being surrounded by skyscrapers and noisy traffic. The landscape blends perfectly with the surrounding city, offering a safe haven in order to view the city from a distance, for a change.

Video:

The High Line Design Video 2008

Negotiations:

  • old vs. new
  • preserving and reusing old structures
  • park vs. city
  • rest in the midst of chaos

For More Information:

http://www.thehighline.org/

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/22/nyregion/22highline.html


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