Posts Tagged ‘design that encourages creativity

The Idea Behind the Bag

Caroline Woolard, an artist of New York, sought to shatter the uncomfortable and dismal feeling that one had while riding a New York subway after 9-11. The constant paranoia evoked by attitudes of the populous and advertisements of public transportation made the atmosphere unpleasantly tense for all riders. In hopes of creating a more playful and carefree atmosphere, she created the a backpack that could easily transform into a swing. These spontaneous mesh swings that could easily be created from average backpacks infused fun back into the lives of the paralyzed New York populous.

notes:
We chose this design project as one of our favorites because of the spontaneity of this cleverly devised solution to a national sorrow. The fact that its purpose is to provide relief is refreshing-some design only serves the purpose of making people smile or making them feel happy. We also like how it is a plausible idea because many subway travelers carrying backpacks and there are huge areas of open space in which swinging could take place. The people who have done it seem pleased as well.

Categories:

social design, communal design, playful design, problem solving design

Negotiations:

wearability of the backpack vs usability of swing, limitations vs freedoms, swinging and enjoying subway rides vs disturbing people and evoking annoyance, cost of design vs size of demand

Take a Seat

10, نوفمبر 2010

Take a Seat

Jason Eppink’s Creative Triumphs

Rooted in New York City subway station, Take a Seat is an ongoing social design project focused on the issue of available seating. By supplying used but perfectly functional chairs from dumpsters and piles of trash, the members of this project were able to reassign chair locations in areas of the station at which subway goers would usually have to stand for extended periods of time. The success of this project dwells on the fact that it makes someones trash another persons useful asset just by the simple idea of reassigning locations of the chairs.

notes: This design project was unique in the fact that it was more of a service then a design. Similar to Eppink’s project that we studied previously in 1060 (the portable wooden bridge built over a messy sidewalk leak), this design is meant for the purpose of serving others without much cost to either side. Specifically, Take A Seat takes used and disposed of chairs and assigns them to a new location and purpose for which they will be adopted and loved which is an awesome alternative to letting it end up in the landfills or to rot as pollution. Putting these used chairs in subway stations is a social design from which all can benefit.

Categories:

social design, community design, innovative design, environmental design

Negotiations:

Usability of chairs vs Aesthetics of chairs, Effective increase of sitting spaces vs. Clutter/hazardous, Spontaneous chair bringing (temporal chairs) vs issue of stealing and crime arising from chair mobility, desire for more seating vs surplus of seating (is there a cap on the number of chairs? who will enforce it?)

REWORKED Negotiations:

Comfort vs. Clutter

Flow of traffic vs. increase of sitting spaces

Individual (introverted) experience vs. group (extroverted) experience

Timeliness vs. Friendliness

Comfort vs. Safety

8bitpeoples and Google Buzz

10, نوفمبر 2010

8BitPeoples

Nullsleep – Supernova Kiss (http://www.8bitpeoples.com/discography/8BP088)

http://www.8bitpeoples.com/

“The 8bitpeoples first came together in 1999 as a collective of artists sharing a common love for classic videogames and an approach to music which reflected this obsession. Our primary interests were to provide quality music for free and most importantly to have fun. In the years since, we have grown in rank and expanded our goals.”(http://www.8bitpeoples.com/about/our_mission)

The 8bitpeoples is a web-based collaborative effort to produce, release, discuss, and enjoy 8-bit(‘chiptune’) music. It is the home of a number of artists, and also hosts many guest artists’ music. Almost every 8bitpeoples release is available to download for free on the website, though occasionally higher quality releases are available for purchase. It also hosts a listing of upcoming shows that the resident artists, as well as guests, are performing at. All of the music is registered under a CC by-NC-ND license(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

8-bit music(also known by other names such as ‘chiptune’ or ‘bitpop’) is one form of music that has become popular at least in part because of the power of the internet to bring people together to collaborate and support one another. This specific interest group is also made possible by the ease of access to recording equipment. As one article says, “Most artists working in the genre cherish a do-it-yourself aesthetic, have little or no musical training and say the programs they use are easy to learn, albeit hard to master. And the instruments are welcomingly cheap. When Game Boy was new in 1989, it retailed for $89. Today, you can buy one on eBay for $4.75.”(http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/24/arts/music/24wein.html?_r=1) One similar musical movement that has emerged recently is Nerdcore:

Another example of a website or collaborative created on the internet(and in many ways for the internet) is Overclocked Remix( “a not-for-profit site that accepts high-quality submissions of arranged or “ReMixed” video game music from talented ReMixers the world over”). (http://ocremix.org/) Their mission, as stated from their website, is as follows:

  • Appreciate and honor video game composers and their music
  • Encourage artistic expression and development through fan arrangements
  • Preserve and promote video game music of the past and present
  • Provide resources and connections for the game composers of tomorrow
  • Distribute great, free music to the world

(http://ocremix.org/info/Mission)

The communities behind both of these related websites have the same goals: to promote their own interests and hobbies by showing off the sheer joy of creation for other people with similar interests, as well as the entire world.

Negotiations:

  • collaboration versus distance
  • enjoyment and capacity for sharing versus ownership
  • special interest and support within a community
  • the music itself: cheap and accessible versus professional and mainstream

Taxonomic Categories:

Community-Based Design, Design that Encourages Creativity, Collaborative Design

Google Buzz

http://www.google.com/buzz

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi50KlsCBio

Google Buzz is one of Google’s newest creations. For those who use Facebook, its basic function is quite familiar. Buzz allows users to share updates, photos, videos, and more. It is built into Google’s Gmail UI, and boasts of many features, including being “photo friendly”; integrated with other websites such as Twitter, Picasa, Flickr, and Google Reader; real time updates; and the ability to recommend interesting posts and weed out others. It is also available on the phone, and allows users to post updates and “ideas”(as Google advertises) from anywhere.

Almost immediately after launch, Google received many complaints regarding the privacy, or supposed lack of, in Buzz. Google “automatically enrolled Gmail users in Buzz, and…publicly exposed data, including users’ most frequent Gmail contacts, without enough user consent.”(http://www.buzzclassaction.com/faq#Q1) Google is currently involved in a class-action lawsuit because of the alleged violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act, and others. Read more at: http://www.buzzclassaction.com/index

Negotiations:

  • privacy versus public information over the internet
  • communication(‘sharing’) in regards to ease of use
  • reach of users(who is this for) – perceived versus actual market

Taxonomic Categories:

Community Based Design, Online Social Framework Design

Valerie Reiss


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