Posts Tagged ‘community-based design

Take a Seat

10, نوفمبر 2010

Take a Seat

Jason Eppink’s Creative Triumphs

Rooted in New York City subway station, Take a Seat is an ongoing social design project focused on the issue of available seating. By supplying used but perfectly functional chairs from dumpsters and piles of trash, the members of this project were able to reassign chair locations in areas of the station at which subway goers would usually have to stand for extended periods of time. The success of this project dwells on the fact that it makes someones trash another persons useful asset just by the simple idea of reassigning locations of the chairs.

notes: This design project was unique in the fact that it was more of a service then a design. Similar to Eppink’s project that we studied previously in 1060 (the portable wooden bridge built over a messy sidewalk leak), this design is meant for the purpose of serving others without much cost to either side. Specifically, Take A Seat takes used and disposed of chairs and assigns them to a new location and purpose for which they will be adopted and loved which is an awesome alternative to letting it end up in the landfills or to rot as pollution. Putting these used chairs in subway stations is a social design from which all can benefit.

Categories:

social design, community design, innovative design, environmental design

Negotiations:

Usability of chairs vs Aesthetics of chairs, Effective increase of sitting spaces vs. Clutter/hazardous, Spontaneous chair bringing (temporal chairs) vs issue of stealing and crime arising from chair mobility, desire for more seating vs surplus of seating (is there a cap on the number of chairs? who will enforce it?)

REWORKED Negotiations:

Comfort vs. Clutter

Flow of traffic vs. increase of sitting spaces

Individual (introverted) experience vs. group (extroverted) experience

Timeliness vs. Friendliness

Comfort vs. Safety

Critical Mass

10, نوفمبر 2010

What: Critical Mass is a bicycling event usually held on the last Friday of the month in over 300 different cities in the world.  The bike ride lasts as long as an individual participant wants. While the group keeps moving, people are welcome to break away when feeling fatigued.  The goal of this event is for bikers to ride as one critical mass, a unified body unimpeded by any red lights and stop signs they encounter.   

Why: This event was founded in 1992 in San Francisco to draw attention to the hostility the city drivers showed towards bicyclists. Critical Mass is not meant to be a protest or demonstration event, but it is seen as a celebration and gathering of city bikers seeking road rights and visibility.  

Who: All bikers are encouraged to join.  In Atlanta, 445 bikers participated in October 2010. The participation in cities range from 20 to an impressive 10,000 participants in Budapest.  

Notes and Rationale: The design and fluidity of Atlanta’s Critical Mass exudes simplicity.  Without much prior planning, besides a location and time to meet, the event flows smoothly with participants looking out for one another and maintaining the cohesion of the group.  Although surrounding cars honk impatiently, participants have learned to use the corking technique in which some bikers sit in front of the cars with green lights to let the remaining mass of bikers pass through the intersection. In an urban, fast-paced event there is always the risk of injury and accidents, so some participants have taken it upon themselves to wear rollerblades.  The rollerblades give individuals ease and flexibility to move among bikes and provide assistance if needed.   The event’s design is rooted in the collaboration of its participants in regards to everything from the route of the bike ride to facilitating safety. An uncomplicated design like Critical Mass that coordinates such a large group of people emphasizes how the most effective structure can be one that is straightforward and simple.

Negotiations:

(1)The bikers among themselves– communication and collaboration

(2) The bikers and government– the right to run lights and stop signs, the right to use passive-aggressive ways to draw attention

(3) Bikers and motorists– positive attention and negative feedback

(4) Bikers and pedestrians– new conflict created due to biker vs. driver conflict

(5) Critical Mass event structure and RAND Corporation– The RAND Corporation produced a report “What Next for Networks and Netwars?” which analyzes the structure of the ride, evaluating the decentralized decision-making for military battlefield use.  

(6) Bikers and non-participating bikers- creation of “Critical Manners” and “Courteous Mass” (bike events that stop at lights and stop signs)

Taxonomic Categories: Urban Outreach Design, Community Cooperation Design, Community-based design, Mass Collaboration Design, Government Attention-drawing Design, Safety-promoting Design

Defend New Orleans

10, نوفمبر 2010

Defend New Orleans

Defend New Orleans is a group which promotes the social, economic, and cultural improvement of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast in general. It began in 2003 as simply a t-shirt, which would support those affected by the devastating hurricane. It has grown into a “community focused lifestyle brand”, and recently came out with a new line of shirts, called “Support the Coast”, which was created to support gulf coast communities in the aftermath of the BP oil spill. The idea behind Defend New Orleans is that they will sell t-shirts, stickers, mugs, etc., give 100% of the proceeds to organizations which are actually providing labor support to those in need, and raise awareness to the situation and the culture which it is threatening. Their main media is their blog located on their website, www.defendneworleans.org, where they post anything from animal threats, to flyers for volunteers needed, to invites to social events. They also use videos, which portray the rich culture on the Gulf Coast, by displaying different bands, activities, and people who serve to enrich the culture. It is very clear how much they are striving to preserve the way of life in New Orleans, and the idea that a simple t-shirt design could inspire such a massive movement is inspiring.


Initial Interpretation:

We were really drawn to this project, because of its small scale roots, and its simple but wide spread cause.  Defend New Orleans is not a group whose main objective is to proactively attack problems but rather to raise awareness to the problems and support other organizations that have the resources to physically make a difference with things like rebuilding New Orleans and cleaning up the oil spill in the gulf. We also liked this idea because our generation in general is obsessed with t-shirts. We all have t-shirts from every event we ever participated in throughout our childhood and still love getting new ones. The fact that a small group of friends designing a t-shirt (which most of can relate to from previous experiences) to simple say, “We support you New Orleans”, could spark this much larger network of people committed to the same cause is remarkable and interesting.

Negotiations:

Raising awareness & providing physical support

Small Cost & More affordability (resulting in more money raised)

Reviving Culture & Helping those in need

Popular Product & Inspiration to join a cause

Video Link:

Inner-City Arts and Grassroots

10, نوفمبر 2010
Group Members: Hilary Yeganegi, Andreas Nilsson, John Walker, Sarah Lashinsky
 

Inner-City Art    

Inner-City Arts    

Notes 
 
 
Inner-City Arts describes itself on it’s website as “an oasis of learning, achievement and creativity for underserved children in the heart of Skid Row”.  The Los Angeles arts education program is a haven for local children and youth, and offers them with every amenity to submerge themselves in studio life.  Professional teaching artists provide hands-on instruction in well-equipped studios.  ICA’s campus is the ideal venue for creation.  Architect Michael Maltzan repurposed an abandoned garage, and outfitted it with simple, geometrical design.  The workspaces manage to accommodate lots of students, yet are still intimate. To kids who may have come to believe that “dreams are for other children”, ICA may be the perfect micro-city in a rough-and-tumble neightborhood.    

 

 

Negotiations    

Architect and Students    

Architect and Business Owners    

Architect and Teachers    

Students and Teachers    

Why did we choose this?    

Inner-City Arts caught our eye when we were browsing around MoMA’s website for their Small Scale, Big Change project.  The campus is so beautiful we were intrigued to discover that it is actually in skid row.  In the end, we’re happy to give this project any exposure; it seems that Inner-City Arts does a lot of good.

http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/smallscalebigchange/projects/inner_city_arts

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_lPWGhJUDw&feature=related

Taxonomic Categories    

Charitable Design, Urban Design, Urban Integration, Community-Based Design

Sources

http://www.inner-cityarts.org/index.php

http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2010/smallscalebigchange/projects/inner_city_arts

    

Grassroots    

Notes    

Grassroots.org is an organization that promotes social changes by endorsing other smaller organizations by offering them money to fulfill their goals. The organization offers an average of $10,000 a year for each organization. Basically the website is there to promote the creation of grassroots organizations and to get them started.    

Negotiations    

Donors and the website    

Donors and Grassroots organizations    

The Website and Grassroots organizations    

Grassroots organizations and society    

Grassroots organizations and their cause    

Why did we choose this?    

Grassroots.org provides money for grassroots organizations that are trying to start a social change, but might not have enough resources to become a fully started organization. Many grassroots organizations have trouble starting up because they are being funded by only a couple of people so usually there is a lack of resources and have trouble spreading their cause. So grassroots.org helps these grassroots organizations spread their cause by funding them.    

Taxonomic Categories    

Societal Design, Communal Design, Economic Design, Charitable Design

Sources

http://www.grassroots.org/

http://www.dnjournal.com/articles/gr.htm

Design Outside the Field

10, نوفمبر 2010

HEIFER INTERNATIONAL

“The idea behind Heifer … is similar to the notion that it’s better to teach a man to fish so he can feed himself than to give him a fish that will feed him just once. One animal could eventually benefit an entire community.” — Associated Press

We chose Heifer International because it is a non-profit company that helps people in an innovative way and does more than just donate money. It is designed to give people a new way of life rather than just a short-term fix. The customer who donates money specifies a particular animal or group of animals, which is gifted to the family in need. These animals are used to produce food, milk, or aid in farming and labor. We have never previously heard of this type of transaction and think it is a fantastic and interesting business model. Because it is so foreign to us, it falls outside of our preconceived notions of “design”. The business introduces a unique type of transaction to satisfy a worldwide need.

Site: http://www.heifer.org/

Categories:

Sustainability

Agriculture

Resource Design

Community Education

Alternative Charity

Household

Negotiations:

Source of Income – Gifts purchased by customers

Short Term – Long Term

Privileged – Needy

Ability – Teaching

Money Donations – Livestock

Resources – Location

Rationale – Explanation

CHINESE APARTMENT EFFICIENT SPACE USE

In densely populated Hong Kong, apartments are small and expensive. Having to copy with tight space, Gary Chang, an architect, decided to ease his lifestyle by designing his 344 sq. ft apartment to be able to transform into 24 different combinations of designs by simply sliding and pulling walls. Calling it the “Domestic Transformer,” his ingenuity takes space efficiency to a whole new level. We were especially struck by his idea of having warm, golden light shine into his tinted windows as a way to keep him happier, even in gloomy weather. We also found it excellent that he placed a mirror on the ceiling to create an allusion of extended space. As future architects, we found Chang’s creativity brilliant and inspiring.

Site: http://man-over-board.com/2010/04/27/amazing-tiny-apartment-transforms-into-a-24-room-living-area/

Categories

Space Efficiency

Urban Living

User-Friendliness

Architectural Arrangement

Negotiations

Space – Necessity

Need – Want

Aesthetics – Functionality

Resources – Utilization


SitBPE | Hannah Williams, Deborah Hudson, Sean Sims, Trey McMillon

The New York Street Advertising Takeover (NYSAT) Project was developed and funded by a group called the Public Ad Campaign.  The goal of the project was to bring public spaces back to the people.  Many of the advertisements seen on billboards in major cities are illegal; yet they do not attract the attention of city officials.  One company that is responsible for 120 illegal advertisements is NPA City Outdoor.  The NYSAT Project set out do whitewash as many of these street level advertisements as possible to bring the public landscapes back to the people and remove the consumerist effects of the ads.

The individuals who were involved in the project are of many different professions and backgrounds. They are brought together by the common idea that public areas should reflect the feelings of the citizens.  During the project, five members were arrested and many of the advertisements were replaced within hours.  Earlier this year, the Public Ad Campaign held the Toronto Street Advertising Takeover (TOSAT) and has expressed interest in holding more of these events in various cities.

We chose this project because of its roots in the importance and significance of public spaces.  The NYSAT Project spread through word of mouth and recruited individuals of many backgrounds.  All of whom were interested in bringing attention to the consumerism and advertising that has been ingrained in our everyday lives (all of which was illegal as well).  It also fostered a medium for which citizens could express their own feelings and spread anti-commercial messages.  After the whitewashing was completed, artists came out to engage the public spaces in ways that would be more personal to fellow users of the space.

Negotiations:

Marketing vs Expression

Legality vs Illegality

Purpose of Public Space

Links:

http://www.publicadcampaign.com/nysat/

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/26/nyregion/26posters.html?_r=2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKYwJ5wKeCU

8bitpeoples and Google Buzz

10, نوفمبر 2010

8BitPeoples

Nullsleep – Supernova Kiss (http://www.8bitpeoples.com/discography/8BP088)

http://www.8bitpeoples.com/

“The 8bitpeoples first came together in 1999 as a collective of artists sharing a common love for classic videogames and an approach to music which reflected this obsession. Our primary interests were to provide quality music for free and most importantly to have fun. In the years since, we have grown in rank and expanded our goals.”(http://www.8bitpeoples.com/about/our_mission)

The 8bitpeoples is a web-based collaborative effort to produce, release, discuss, and enjoy 8-bit(‘chiptune’) music. It is the home of a number of artists, and also hosts many guest artists’ music. Almost every 8bitpeoples release is available to download for free on the website, though occasionally higher quality releases are available for purchase. It also hosts a listing of upcoming shows that the resident artists, as well as guests, are performing at. All of the music is registered under a CC by-NC-ND license(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

8-bit music(also known by other names such as ‘chiptune’ or ‘bitpop’) is one form of music that has become popular at least in part because of the power of the internet to bring people together to collaborate and support one another. This specific interest group is also made possible by the ease of access to recording equipment. As one article says, “Most artists working in the genre cherish a do-it-yourself aesthetic, have little or no musical training and say the programs they use are easy to learn, albeit hard to master. And the instruments are welcomingly cheap. When Game Boy was new in 1989, it retailed for $89. Today, you can buy one on eBay for $4.75.”(http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/24/arts/music/24wein.html?_r=1) One similar musical movement that has emerged recently is Nerdcore:

Another example of a website or collaborative created on the internet(and in many ways for the internet) is Overclocked Remix( “a not-for-profit site that accepts high-quality submissions of arranged or “ReMixed” video game music from talented ReMixers the world over”). (http://ocremix.org/) Their mission, as stated from their website, is as follows:

  • Appreciate and honor video game composers and their music
  • Encourage artistic expression and development through fan arrangements
  • Preserve and promote video game music of the past and present
  • Provide resources and connections for the game composers of tomorrow
  • Distribute great, free music to the world

(http://ocremix.org/info/Mission)

The communities behind both of these related websites have the same goals: to promote their own interests and hobbies by showing off the sheer joy of creation for other people with similar interests, as well as the entire world.

Negotiations:

  • collaboration versus distance
  • enjoyment and capacity for sharing versus ownership
  • special interest and support within a community
  • the music itself: cheap and accessible versus professional and mainstream

Taxonomic Categories:

Community-Based Design, Design that Encourages Creativity, Collaborative Design

Google Buzz

http://www.google.com/buzz

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi50KlsCBio

Google Buzz is one of Google’s newest creations. For those who use Facebook, its basic function is quite familiar. Buzz allows users to share updates, photos, videos, and more. It is built into Google’s Gmail UI, and boasts of many features, including being “photo friendly”; integrated with other websites such as Twitter, Picasa, Flickr, and Google Reader; real time updates; and the ability to recommend interesting posts and weed out others. It is also available on the phone, and allows users to post updates and “ideas”(as Google advertises) from anywhere.

Almost immediately after launch, Google received many complaints regarding the privacy, or supposed lack of, in Buzz. Google “automatically enrolled Gmail users in Buzz, and…publicly exposed data, including users’ most frequent Gmail contacts, without enough user consent.”(http://www.buzzclassaction.com/faq#Q1) Google is currently involved in a class-action lawsuit because of the alleged violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act, and others. Read more at: http://www.buzzclassaction.com/index

Negotiations:

  • privacy versus public information over the internet
  • communication(‘sharing’) in regards to ease of use
  • reach of users(who is this for) – perceived versus actual market

Taxonomic Categories:

Community Based Design, Online Social Framework Design

Valerie Reiss

The High Line

9, نوفمبر 2010

By Samantha Sussberg, Carly Smith, Kiyah Critendon, Jennifer Driesbach


The High Line is the perfect example of innovative design- taking old ideas and recreating them into new ones. This park is located on the West Side in Manhattan’s Meat Packing District. This area was constructed in the 1930’s in order to elevate industrial freight trains and get them off of the streets of New York. A section of this old structure was turned over to the city of New York and redesigned as a public park. The park was finally opened in June, 2009, and stretches for about a mile and a half. While walking through this narrow strip of park, it is easy to forget that you are in the middle of a city; that is, until you remember being surrounded by skyscrapers and noisy traffic. The landscape blends perfectly with the surrounding city, offering a safe haven in order to view the city from a distance, for a change.

Video:

The High Line Design Video 2008

Negotiations:

  • old vs. new
  • preserving and reusing old structures
  • park vs. city
  • rest in the midst of chaos

For More Information:

http://www.thehighline.org/

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/22/nyregion/22highline.html


top