Café Habana

10 نوفمبر
2010

Andrea Del Risco, Michelle Kraus, Colleen Lu

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uin-Wjvqiio

Café Habana is a restaurant designed to minimize waste, use efficient alternative sources of energy, and educate clients about green methods. The restaurant is as eco-friendly as possible, recycling objects like an old mail truck, and turning it into a lunch truck instead; using solar roofs; encouraging recycling with bio-degradable products; sorted trash bins; and reusing sink and rain water for flushing the toilet. Waiters also make it a point to inform customers about the restaurant’s sustainable efforts and encourage them to do the same. From mail truck to toilet water, everything in Café Habana is geared towards reducing production of trash and reusing what it can.

In the popular trend of “going green”, Café Habana is a clear choice for our case studies. Within a business, it maximizes the different sustainable methods that can be used in a community. Not only does it have its focus on keeping its own environment “green”, it encourages the community it participates in to do so as well. By giving discounts to people who bicycle-power their smoothies and giving excess energy from their solar panels to the neighboring apartments, Café Habana incentivizes their customers and neighbors to join the “green” movement.

Categories:

Resourceful Design, Green Design, Sustainable Design, Community Design

Negotiations:

Profit vs. Environment, Traditional vs. Progressive, Waste vs. Recycle

http://cafehabana.com/index.htm

نوفمبر 10th, 2010 by

Teague, Gardens, and Fun

10 نوفمبر
2010

Team Will

Will McCollum, Linda Ortiz, Victoria Acevedo, Georgia Wang

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

Teague: Give Water

How much water can TEAGUE help us conserve?

Showers, washing cars, tending golf courses, washing hands… Americans waste a lot of water doing everyday chores and activities. Utility bills do not isolate specific activities like washing dishes or brushing teeth, so there is no way to pinpoint where water is being overused and where it could be conserved. Even Georgia Tech, a school that ranks number two on the list of the most sustainable universities in the nation, wastes water in the dining halls, residential buildings, football stadium, and class buildings. The possible reason? The lack of awareness. Water, a resource often conveyed as free, is not without price and consequence if we still choose to carelessly use. Enter case study.

This case study recognizes the mostly American problem of wasting water and finding new, innovative ways to show awareness of people’s actions. It involves a group of Teague designers conducting an experiment and wanting to find out if people would consciously conserve water if they knew how much was flowing down the drain as they used the sink. The group created an Arduino water meter (DIY blog can be found on this site) attached to a facet that would take water measurements at the start of facet use at real time. This would allow people using the sink to see how much water they are using at the time. On average, gallons of water were conserved for everyday activities, netting a 75% water savings!  While people used the sink, they consciously turned off the tap when they did not use it. An experiment success! Not only did this experiment altered the way people used water, made them conserve, and spread awareness, they had a surplus of water which they teamed up with and donated to those who needed the fresh water through My Charity: Water.

TEAGUE Give Water

Negotiations:

•    The swap of ignorance and knowledge
•    The want to conserve and the unregulated use of water
•    The interaction of those who waste water and those who need

We chose this case study because it clearly shows a problem and a way to approach the resolution of the problem in a small scale setting. There are also many ways to continue on from Teague’s experiment!

Links:

http://mycharitywater.org
http://labs.teague.com/?p=722
http://www.teague.com/2010/11/give-water/

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

Atlanta City Hall Pilot Green Roof

Who knew a roof could be green? Ok, truth be told, we have all probably heard of Green roofs sometime in our lives. These little miracles are not much of a surprise, but don’t let their popularity draw you away from their importance in our environment. We decided to choose these unique rooftops as one of our case studies because not only are green roofs apart of the Atlanta community, but they will soon become a part of our very own Georgia Tech community, at the new CULC building, come Fall 2011. We will get the opportunity to experience the quality of these roofs firsthand and become engulfed in their natural design and innovative structure.

The Atlanta City Hall Pilot Green Roof is the first city-owned green roof in the Southeast. This ecological design stands as a prerequisite for other green roofs that have spread across the states. Green roofs are highly beneficial for urban areas that are physically unable to incorporate long, lust fields of vegetation with the abundance of buildings.  Not only do they enhance the air we breathe and create peaceful environments to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city, these green delights reduce extremely hot summer temperatures and lessen the storm water load on our sewer system.

Negotiations:

Effort of production vs. Final outcome

Investment in equipment vs. Ecological Revenue

Natural vulnerability vs. Strength in numbers

Links:

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/2CxE5y/www.treehugger.com/galleries/2009/06/green-roofs-are-changing-architecture.php%3Fpage%3D1

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/21bceC/www.treehugger.com/galleries/2009/06/green-roofs-are-changing-architecture.php%3Fpage%3D14

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/A7Dtkv/inhabitat.com/2010/08/30/beautiful-underground-aloni-house-blends-in-with-the-earth/

http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=65

http://www.atlantaga.gov/mayor/energyconservationgreenroof.aspx

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

The Fun Theory

We make choices everyday. Whether the decision is about ourselves, others, or the environment, each is important. Often we choose the option that is most harmful simply because it requires the least amount of energy and contains the least amount of resistance. The Volkswagen company launched a contest in which change is inspired by fun, calling their project the Fun Theory.

Hoping to inspire innovative ideas, Volkswagen carried out three projects of their own. In the first, a generally unused glass bottle recycling collector was converted into a arcade-like game, allowing the users to stack up points for each bottle collected and put into the correct slot. The results are surprising.

Bottle Arcade

The second aimed to change the lazy habits of routine 21st century society. Though the invention of escalators definitely aided in the design of buildings and has altered the way people travel through large buildings, it has created some very lazy tendencies. Many people will wait in line to ride up an escalator, even if the stairs located right next to the escalator are open. By turning seemingly ordinary stairs into a piano, the Volkswagen company hoped to encourage more widespread use of the stairs.

Musical Stairs

Their last example targeted the problem of making sure trash is placed in the trashcan, and not on the ground next to it. When people miss the trashcan when throwing their garbage away, they often simply leave it on the ground. By adding a motion sensor and sound effects to the trashcan, Volkswagen believed that people would enjoy throwing trash away. It worked.

Deep Trash Can

By creating these examples, Volkswagen encouraged creative responses to its Fun Theory contest. After many submissions, an entry that displayed innovation, a light-hearted spirit, and change was chosen. The Speed Camera Lottery was a system created to encourage safe driving by following the speed limit. When the correct speed is recorded on this system, a picture is taken of the person and their registration number. This data is automatically entered into a lottery, whose pot is financed by the money collected from speeding tickets. This incentive-based system proved extremely effective.

Speed Limit Lottery

Negotiations:

Incentive and social change

Out-of-the-ordinary and fascination

Routine and change

Laughter and world issues

Links:


http://www.thefuntheory.com/

http://mashable.com/2009/10/11/the-fun-theory/

http://www.hja.net/legal-news/news-articles-list/directnews-import/motorists-face-a-postcode.aspx

نوفمبر 10th, 2010 by

8bitpeoples and Google Buzz

10 نوفمبر
2010

8BitPeoples

Nullsleep – Supernova Kiss (http://www.8bitpeoples.com/discography/8BP088)

http://www.8bitpeoples.com/

“The 8bitpeoples first came together in 1999 as a collective of artists sharing a common love for classic videogames and an approach to music which reflected this obsession. Our primary interests were to provide quality music for free and most importantly to have fun. In the years since, we have grown in rank and expanded our goals.”(http://www.8bitpeoples.com/about/our_mission)

The 8bitpeoples is a web-based collaborative effort to produce, release, discuss, and enjoy 8-bit(‘chiptune’) music. It is the home of a number of artists, and also hosts many guest artists’ music. Almost every 8bitpeoples release is available to download for free on the website, though occasionally higher quality releases are available for purchase. It also hosts a listing of upcoming shows that the resident artists, as well as guests, are performing at. All of the music is registered under a CC by-NC-ND license(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

8-bit music(also known by other names such as ‘chiptune’ or ‘bitpop’) is one form of music that has become popular at least in part because of the power of the internet to bring people together to collaborate and support one another. This specific interest group is also made possible by the ease of access to recording equipment. As one article says, “Most artists working in the genre cherish a do-it-yourself aesthetic, have little or no musical training and say the programs they use are easy to learn, albeit hard to master. And the instruments are welcomingly cheap. When Game Boy was new in 1989, it retailed for $89. Today, you can buy one on eBay for $4.75.”(http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/24/arts/music/24wein.html?_r=1) One similar musical movement that has emerged recently is Nerdcore:

Another example of a website or collaborative created on the internet(and in many ways for the internet) is Overclocked Remix( “a not-for-profit site that accepts high-quality submissions of arranged or “ReMixed” video game music from talented ReMixers the world over”). (http://ocremix.org/) Their mission, as stated from their website, is as follows:

  • Appreciate and honor video game composers and their music
  • Encourage artistic expression and development through fan arrangements
  • Preserve and promote video game music of the past and present
  • Provide resources and connections for the game composers of tomorrow
  • Distribute great, free music to the world

(http://ocremix.org/info/Mission)

The communities behind both of these related websites have the same goals: to promote their own interests and hobbies by showing off the sheer joy of creation for other people with similar interests, as well as the entire world.

Negotiations:

  • collaboration versus distance
  • enjoyment and capacity for sharing versus ownership
  • special interest and support within a community
  • the music itself: cheap and accessible versus professional and mainstream

Taxonomic Categories:

Community-Based Design, Design that Encourages Creativity, Collaborative Design

Google Buzz

http://www.google.com/buzz

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yi50KlsCBio

Google Buzz is one of Google’s newest creations. For those who use Facebook, its basic function is quite familiar. Buzz allows users to share updates, photos, videos, and more. It is built into Google’s Gmail UI, and boasts of many features, including being “photo friendly”; integrated with other websites such as Twitter, Picasa, Flickr, and Google Reader; real time updates; and the ability to recommend interesting posts and weed out others. It is also available on the phone, and allows users to post updates and “ideas”(as Google advertises) from anywhere.

Almost immediately after launch, Google received many complaints regarding the privacy, or supposed lack of, in Buzz. Google “automatically enrolled Gmail users in Buzz, and…publicly exposed data, including users’ most frequent Gmail contacts, without enough user consent.”(http://www.buzzclassaction.com/faq#Q1) Google is currently involved in a class-action lawsuit because of the alleged violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act, and others. Read more at: http://www.buzzclassaction.com/index

Negotiations:

  • privacy versus public information over the internet
  • communication(‘sharing’) in regards to ease of use
  • reach of users(who is this for) – perceived versus actual market

Taxonomic Categories:

Community Based Design, Online Social Framework Design

Valerie Reiss

نوفمبر 10th, 2010 by

Glif

10 نوفمبر
2010

Andrea Del Risco, Michelle Kraus, Colleen Lu

The Glif is a simple design that has multiple purposes. It was created as a means of enhancing the iPhone4 experience. The creators wanted to develop a way that was easier for iPhone4 users to take photos, videos, video chat, and view information hands-free. Through the Glif, they managed to create a product attachment that was both sleek and functional.

Glif being used as a mini-computer stand.

We chose this product because of its versatility and relativity to today’s society. Since there is such a heavy focus on technology and functionality, the Glif is a perfect example of design that incorporates both into a simple attachment. The fact that it is also relatively small adds to its appeal. Most attachments today are working on becoming less bulky, but the Glif has already achieved that. Instead of being stored separately from the phone, the Glif can remain attached and serve as an antennae protector.

Taxonomic Categories:

Enhancement Design, Technological Design, Innovative Design, Multipurpose Design, Interaction Design

Negotiations:

Multifunctions vs. Single Functions

Hands-free vs. Hand-held

Official Site: http://theglif.com/

نوفمبر 10th, 2010 by

Dead Drops

9 نوفمبر
2010

The idea behind this is having USB ports embedded into concrete walls and people can walk up and connect with them and put up files that they want others to see. This allows for a community file sharing system. This started in New York City and only five were posted. Many people have wanted this to come to other places, especially Atlanta, Georgia. We chose this because we believe this is a great idea and it would allow people to feed off others ideas and develop them further. We think there are great ideas out there and this could be a great start to getting them out into the public.

Negotiations:

– People sharing files/ideas with other people

The Dead Drops project allows the community to share personal files with one another. Not only this but people are also able to share ideas through the dead drops that can be found around the nation. It can also be seen as a more active form of Peer to Peer file sharing system. However, there is the issue of misusage of copyrighted files and of the dead drops themselves.

-Environment and people

Through the Dead Drops project people can learn more about their surroundings. In trying to share an idea, people are forced to go to the dead drops locations in order to put their files inside the usb drives. This also provides a sort of entertainment for those who are truly amused by the idea behind the project.

Some more Negotiations to think about would involve:

clean files vs the spread of virus’ and illegal documents

easy access vs the ambiguity of other dead drops

legally placing drops vs destroying property when placing dead drops

Dead Drops \”How To\” Video!

-Go to www.deaddrops.com for more information.  Check out this Video!

نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

lithium | language mission

9 نوفمبر
2010

Linguist on mission to save Inuit ‘fossil language’ disappearing with the ice
commentary by lithium | Rachel Wu, Geoffrey Rees, Caitlyn Simpson, Marlon Brazelton

Inuit seal hunter at work

Stephen Pax Leonard, a Cambridge academic researcher, has decided to travel to Greenland for a year in order to document the dying language of a small Inughuit community. Because of the gradual progression of global warming, the northwestern Inughuit way of life has been continually threatened. In only a few short years (estimated 10-15), the Inughuits will be forced to move further south, where they will assimilate into modern culture whether they wish to or not, and their current way of life will be lost.

Leonard plans to live with the Inughuits in order to learn their language and to compose an “ethnography of speaking”- a record of the Inughuits’ language and culture interactions- rather than a simple dictionary in order to fully express every aspect of the northernmost Inuits’ culture. He hopes to bring more attention to the serious issue of language extinction that is so often underestimated by people in these modern, progressive times.

Stephen Pax Leonard

rationale

lithium decided to focus on this article because language is such an important element in our lives. We don’t realize what we really take for granted; languages disappear every day, and we forget that they existed. James Pax Leonard is going against the flow. He’s trying to preserve the language in a vibrant, relatable way. lithium hopes to be able to relate the various operational procedures Leonard is planning to implement to aspects of design and consumerism. If lithium goes forward with this topic, this will be our objective. Leonard is focusing on how a trait affects people; lithium will study how design is formed through some aspect of culture.

negotiations

cultural progression vs. religious tradition

environmental transformation vs. settled population

small scale perspective vs. modern mass media

taxonomic categories

language-based design; organizational design; preservation design

links

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/aug/13/inuit-language-culture-threatened

http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/Cambridge/Chilling-out-with-Innuit-to-log-shrinking-culture.htm

نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

Schools for Schools

9 نوفمبر
2010

Group Members: Kiyah Critendon, Jennifer Driesbach, Samantha Sussberg, Carly Smith

If you have never heard of the organization ‘Invisible Children’, you won’t be familiar with their organization ‘Schools for Schools’. Let us start off by explaining what Invisible Children is. In Uganda, a country in Africa, there are thousands of citizens living in poverty. A group of people part of the Invisible Children organization has raised money in support to make Uganda a better place to live. The organization, ‘Schools for Schools’ specifically targets the educational well being of young children in Uganda. The organization receives donations from high schools and colleges in the United States to spend towards the education in Africa. Whichever school raises the most money can have the opportunity to go to Uganda and volunteer to make the school system better. The detailed areas of implementation of Schools for School are water and sanitation, books and supplies, construction of new facilities, and technology. Some specific innovative solutions are the Interlocking Soil Stabilized Blocks (ISSB), which was designed to be high quality, and inexpensive versus the average brick used in most construction.

Notes:

  • Ways to go to Uganda: Most money, creative idea
  • The money goes towards: technology (classrooms, water systems, dorm rooms, administrative buildings, science labs, and libraries), software (teacher and administration training, curriculum development)

Negotiations:

  • Education vs. Money
  • Opportunity vs. Volunteer’s education

More information: http://s4s.invisiblechildren.com/

Video: Schools 4 Schools

نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

The High Line

9 نوفمبر
2010

By Samantha Sussberg, Carly Smith, Kiyah Critendon, Jennifer Driesbach


The High Line is the perfect example of innovative design- taking old ideas and recreating them into new ones. This park is located on the West Side in Manhattan’s Meat Packing District. This area was constructed in the 1930’s in order to elevate industrial freight trains and get them off of the streets of New York. A section of this old structure was turned over to the city of New York and redesigned as a public park. The park was finally opened in June, 2009, and stretches for about a mile and a half. While walking through this narrow strip of park, it is easy to forget that you are in the middle of a city; that is, until you remember being surrounded by skyscrapers and noisy traffic. The landscape blends perfectly with the surrounding city, offering a safe haven in order to view the city from a distance, for a change.

Video:

The High Line Design Video 2008

Negotiations:

  • old vs. new
  • preserving and reusing old structures
  • park vs. city
  • rest in the midst of chaos

For More Information:

http://www.thehighline.org/

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/22/nyregion/22highline.html

نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

NewspaperWood

9 نوفمبر
2010

Everyday, 73 percent of the world’s newspapers are recycled and used to produce new materials such as newsprint.  This is greatly increased from the 30 percent that was recycled back in the 1980’s. With the large amount of resources, more options are opened for the use of the recycled paper. A young designer by the name of Mieke Miejer has invented a new design for wood using many sheets of newspaper. With the combined effort of Vij5 Design Company in Sweeden, Miejer has produced a sustainable material that can be cut and sanded as if it were real wood. The many layers of newspaper create a similar look to the rings in the wood of a tree. The design is resourceful and flips the natural process of making wood to lengthen the usability life of a single tree. The wood is cut and made into paper. After being recycled, the paper is transformed back into wood. The design cycle doubles the use and could potentially cut the amount of trees destroyed drastically.

Categories: Eco-friendly design, resourceful design, company design

Negotiations: Designer and Company Collaboration, urban life versus ecosystem, designer versus resources, and material waste versus invention

نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

Bicing

9 نوفمبر
2010

Bicing is a community bicycle program in Barcelona, Spain that allows citizens to use bikes in high-traffic areas then return them to another Bicing station.  The purpose of the program is to allow commuters to travel in an environmentally-friendly way that cuts carbon emissions and relieves  traffic congestion.  The system is only 30 € per year, which makes it a cheap option for public transportation.  The bicycles are specially designed to prevent theft of parts.

Bicing Video

This video shows how helpful the Bicing system is to commuters in Barcelona.

A citizen returns a bike at a Bicing station

Negotiations: The negotiations are  between traffic and commuting, efficiency versus conservation, and community sharing versus consumerism.

Taxonomic Categories: environmental corrective design, community design.

An example of one of the bikes which are designed to prevent theft of parts.

We chose this design-fix because it helps the consumer without hurting their wallets and it also benefits the environment.  The concept of community bicycle sharing is one that could be adapted to use in many other cities as well as areas like college campuses.

نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

lithium | common sense

9 نوفمبر
2010

A Green Light for Common Sense

commentary by lithium | Rachel Wu, Geoffrey Rees, Caitlyn Simpson, Marlon Brazelton

the streets of Bohmte, Germany

In Bohmte, Germany, a new solution to traffic management is being tested. Instead of implementing more restrictions with more reinforcement, in this German town, the citizens decided to completely revamp the way traffic is directed. They are tearing up streets and sidewalks and creating a neutral space in which nearly all traffic regulations are removed; instead of barely following traffic regulations, people are having to rely on their common sense to get them around. There are only two basic rules of the road: the speed limit is 30 miles per hour, and everyone must yield to the right.

a police officer in Bohmte

This new practice has proven statistically to be effective, with the incidence of traffic accidents reducing up to 95% in an area. Even with its successes, however, the new laws have been criticized, often constructively. This traffic management is only effective in lower traffic areas; roads on which these principles apply must also be only of a certain length lest the drivers just choose to circumvent the area completely.

rationale

lithium was intrigued by this set of traffic regulations because of how relient the theory is on the inherent decency of people. Within this “common sense management”, several aspects of design can be derived and researched. For instance, the ambiguous design of the street and sidewalk has a multitude of design negotiations behind it.

negotiations

pedestrian vs. vehicle traffic

modern vs. traditional city planning

being guided by common sense vs.  being guided by rules and regulations

taxonomic categories

community-centric design; organizational design; cooperative design; transit design

links

http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/007750.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/12/23/AR2007122302487.html

نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

SABHA and Astoria Scum River

9 نوفمبر
2010
Bethania Branch of SABHA
 
Dedicated towards promoting sustainable development in rural India, the Bethania CAS (Community Action Service) Group is part of the parent organization SABHA and is based at the Atlanta International School. A prime example of “Sustainable Design in a Service Environment”, Bethania strives to better the living conditions of those living in the Bethania Orphanage through unconventional means of aid. Instead of funneling money raised by the organization straight into the orphanage, Bethania takes that money and uses it to purchase items that the orphanage can then use to take charge of its own betterment. In the past, these items have taken the form of cattle, seeds, and even a water pump system that has now become indispensible. By altering the design of community service and foreign aid, the dependency cycle is broken and the children that were once receivers of aid can become self-sufficient adults that can then, in turn, benefit their own community. This is Bethania’s ultimate goal.

Taxonomic Categories:
– Sustainable Design
– Community Beneficial Design
– Global Oriented Design

Negotiations:
– Relationship between the “donor” and the “receiver”.
– Cyclical relationship between further education and bettering the overall community.
– Return flow of aid from former “receivers” after they have secured careers.

Astoria Scum River Bridge
Art is capable of many things, taking the form of a painting, a poster, or even a small bridge with enough room for a single pedestrian to cross. The story of the Astoria Scum River Bridge is an interesting one and shows how a simple act of designing and then building can set into motion a community response to a problem. By building the Astoria Scum River Bridge, Posterchild and Jason Eppink called attention to a leak that had been left unattended for decades, spilling out water onto the sidewalk that would then freeze in the winter and become hazardous to pedestrians. The bridge was a piece of ironic design, of protesting through “solving”. It fixed through not fixing and it that way it is absolutely brilliant.
Taxonomic Categories:
– Community Beneficial Design
– Protest Through Design
– Unsolving Design
Negotiations:
– How to effectively get the problem across to the right people.
– How to obtain the resources needed.
– How to make sure that the same problem doesn’t happen again.
نوفمبر 9th, 2010 by

Eco-Friendly Design

7 نوفمبر
2010

TechTacular: Sarah Brand, Gita Khote, Hyuk Jin Yoon, Myke Jones

AMPHIBIOUS ARCHITECTURE

We wanted to find a case study that dealt with ecofriendly design and that would have a greater impact on larger cities since we live in Atlanta. Originally we found our idea after listening to a speech by Natalie Jeremijenko on design, engineering, and the ecosystem.  She spoke of a project about “texting fish.” Further research led us to learn about the project Amphibious Architecture which is being sponsored by the Architectural League.  This innovative idea leads to interaction between humans, fish, and their shared ecosystem.  This project uses a network of floating tubes in rivers that measure and monitor water quality, presence of fish, and human interest.  This system is currently in use in the East River and Bronx River in New York City.  These tubes float in the water with three feet above and three feet below.  At the top of the tube there is a light that glows different colors to convey changes in water quality. When dissolved oxygen is high, the light shines a blue-green color, and when it’s low it shines red.  The light also turns on when a fish swims under it, letting passerby beside the water know how abundant the fish population is in that area. People can also interact with this system by “texting the fish.”  When one sends the message, the floating buoy will blink twice to confirm that it has received the message.  The person will then get a response that contains the current status of the river (changes in oxygen levels, quantity of fish).  This project allows people to interact with and show an interest in their ecosystem.  This project is currently being presented at the ‘Toward the Sentient City’ exhibit at the Architectural League.

The taxonomic categories that we placed this project in are Bio-Interactive Design, Social Awareness Design, and Scientific Design.  These all show the different facets of design this project covers.  Some negotiations involved in this project might include how to implement this design without adversely affecting river life and traffic, how to financially accomplish this project on a larger scale, and how the materials and equipment will hold up against the water in the changing seasons.

This video is where we found both of our chosen design projects.  It discusses several other eco-design ideas as well.

Sources

http://www.ted.com/talks/natalie_jeremijenko_the_art_of_the_eco_mindshift.html

http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/16/view/8977/the-living-amphibious-architecture.html

http://www.sentientcity.net/exhibit/?p=5

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/280190


NOPARK GREEN SPACE

As previously stated, we focused on case studies that deal with eco-friendly designs that can impact large cities such as Atlanta. As before, our second case study, a project know as “No Park”, originates from Natalie Jeremijenko’s “The Art of the Eco-mind Shift”, an address to correct environmental woes by combining art, engineering, environmentalism, and biochemistry to create real-life experiments that enable social change.  This innovative idea, designed by Xclinic (the environmental health clinic + lab) of New York University, is about landscaping the no parking fire hydrant spaces with mosses, grasses, and other vegetation. This environmental design provides several benefits, especially in cities, where many pollutants exist on streets. These micro-engineered green spaces prevent storm water run off; stop pollutants from traveling into estuary systems; stabilize soil through use of foliages; and provide durable low-maintenance surface cover. More importantly, these green spaces will decrease carbon dioxide levels by sequestering some of the airborne pollutants while at the same time infiltrating all road-born pollution. Furthermore, because the surface cover is filled with mosses and grasses, fire trucks can still park in these spaces for emergency. The flatten plants will be able to regenerate after the emergency situation, and continue to infiltrate pollutants during normal, non-emergency days.

Taxonomic categories

Activist Design, Urban Space Design, Environmental Corrective Design, Micro-Landscape Design, Fire-Hydrant Garden Design

Negotiations

Negotiations include: who maintains these green spaces and how they are maintained; how pedestrians and commuters treat these spaces; how the project is financed into who pays what; and where will these spaces exist and for how long.

Sources:

http://www.ted.com/talks/natalie_jeremijenko_the_art_of_the_eco_mindshift.html (speech)

http://www.environmentalhealthclinic.net/projects/nopark/

Video:

نوفمبر 7th, 2010 by

Research & Framing Schedule

1 نوفمبر
2010

Research & Framing project is worth 20% of the course grade with individual assignment weighted accordingly.

Nov 03-10: Assignment 0 : 5% :  Hello World! & Research Artifacts

Nov 10-24: Assignment 1  : 5% : Documentation & Analysis Phase              

Dec 01-14: Assignment 2 : 10% :  Roaming, Grazing, & Ruminating…Reflective Essay        

نوفمبر 1st, 2010 by
top